Missa in Angustiis D minor Hob XXII 11,1798 : Nelson-messe

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Missa in Angustiis D minor Hob XXII 11,1798 : Nelson-messe

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dc.contributor.other Joseph Haydn es
dc.contributor.other Kathrin Graf es
dc.contributor.other Verena Piller es
dc.contributor.other Ernst Haefliger es
dc.contributor.other Jakob Stämpfli es
dc.contributor.other Berner Kammerchor es
dc.contributor.other Berner Kammerorchester es
dc.contributor.other Jörg Ewald Dähler es
dc.coverage.spatial Bern, Switzerland es
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-28T23:17:40Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-28T23:17:40Z
dc.date.issued 2012-07-28
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1249
dc.description.abstract In the early days of August 1798, the British Admiral Lord Nelson engaged Napoleon's fleet at Aboukir Bay, near the mouth of the Nile River. Nelson's victory in what became known as the Battle of the Nile was a major breakthrough in the battle against the French. News of it traveled quickly, and Nelson became a celebrated hero. Back at the Esterházy court, Franz Josef Haydn was putting the finishing touches to his Mass in D minor, the third of six masses he wrote over the years 1796 to 1802 to commemorate the nameday of Princess Marie Hermenegild, the wife of his patron Prince Nikolaus II Esterházy. Haydn had already taken note of the war against Napoleon in his Mass in Time of War (1796), and there are likewise allusions to the fighting in the Mass in D minor—Haydn's only mass in a minor key—whose original title, Missa in angustiis, can be translated as Mass in Time of Difficulty or Anxiety. The news of Nelson's victory had probably reached Esterháza by the time of the first performance of the mass, under Haydn's direction, on September 23, 1798; in September 1800, Admiral Nelson himself visited Eisenstadt on his return trip to London. While there, he heard a performance of the D minor Mass, which by that point was firmly associated with him—hence the nickname which has come down to us. The atmosphere of war is evident in the opening Kyrie, especially the harshness of its trumpet and timpani fanfares. The celebratory Gloria that follows evokes the figure of Handel, with whose music Haydn had become well acquainted during his years in London earlier in the 1790s. A lovely, peaceful Qui tollis is at the heart of the Gloria, in which the bass soloist is supported by the chorus and gentle decoration from the organ (probably played by Haydn himself at the work's premiere). The Credo begins traditionally with an old church melody sung polyphonically by the chorus. Then it moves into a ravishing Et incarnatus for the soprano soloist, the usual darkening of mood as the text refers to the Crucifixion, and lastly a brightening of spirit at the Et resurrexit. A brief, restrained Sanctus follows. The portentous Benedictus dominates the second half of the mass; the anger of the hammering of the trumpets and timpani towards its end is one of the fiercest passages in all of Haydn's music. The mood changes with a sweetly flowing Agnus Dei for the vocal soloists, and the chorus takes over for the rousing Dona Nobis Pacem which concludes the work. © All Music Guide es
dc.description.tableofcontents Missa in Angustiis D minor Hob. XXII: 11, 1978 ; Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Benedictus, Agnus Dei-- es
dc.format.medium 1 CD Rom (42 min., 29 seg) : Stereo 4 3/4 plg es
dc.language.iso en_US es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcsh Masses es
dc.title Missa in Angustiis D minor Hob XXII 11,1798 : Nelson-messe es
dc.title.alternative Missa in Angustiis es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es


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