Piano concertos 2 and 3

DSpace Repository

Piano concertos 2 and 3

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.other Sergei Rachmaninoff es
dc.contributor.other Idil Biret es
dc.contributor.other Antoni Wit es
dc.contributor.other Polskie Radio. Wielka Orkiestra Symfoniczna. es
dc.contributor.other Naxos Digital Services es
dc.coverage.spatial Katowice, Polonia es
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-28T01:48:54Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-28T01:48:54Z
dc.date.copyright 2000 es
dc.date.issued 2012-07-27
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/167
dc.description.abstract Rachmaninov composed this work in 1900, and played the first complete performance on November 9, 1901, with Alexandre Siloti conducting the Moscow Philharmonic Society. He suffered a shattering career crisis in the 1897 massacre of his First Symphony in St. Petersburg, by its first conductor, Glazunov, who was reportedly disablingly drunk—a fiasco the critics en masse, led by César Cui, laid at the composer's feet like an animal carcass. The audience—ever mindful that Rachmaninov had been expelled in 1885 from the local temple of musical instruction—listened stonily, glad for the failure of a young lion schooled elsewhere (in Moscow, he completed the Conservatory course in 1891, and graduated a year later with highest possible grades). Because of the failure of the Symphony No. 1, Rachmaninov began to drink immoderately. Believing himself unfit to compose, he tried concentrating on parallel courses as a concert soloist and opera conductor, but embroiled himself in a love affair that ended very badly. By the end of 1899, he was an alcoholic whose hands shook, imperiling his keyboard career. Between January and April 1900, Sergey Vassilyevich saw Dr. Dahl, a Moscow specialist in "neuropsychotherapy," daily, and was urged under hypnosis to compose the new piano concerto that a London impresario was asking for. Trance therapy roused the composer from his lethargy; indeed, he worked with great facility on an excellent new concerto—the Second, in C minor, Op. 18—dedicated to Dr. Dahl in gratitude. Never again in the remaining four decades of his life was Rachmaninov immobilized by depression, despite several convulsive changes of fortune. The opening, C minor, movement in sonata form was composed last; structurally it is the most conventional. Ten bars of unaccompanied keyboard chords lead directly to a palpitant principal theme for violins, violas, and clarinets—motivic rather than tuneful, despite a melismatic extension for cellos. An episode links this to the second theme, in E flat, one of Rachmaninov's most celebrated melodies, introduced by the piano. Following the development and a maestoso alla marcia reprise, there's a brilliant coda—but no solo cadenza, yet. In the E major, Adagio sostenuto movement, after four bars of Tchaikovskian string chords, piano arpeggios introduce a two-part principal theme, played first by the solo flute, then by the solo clarinet. Piano and orchestra develop both parts before a Tchaikovsky-like theme for bassoons nudges the tempo a bit. Further development goes even quicker, culminating in a solo cadenza that's been teasingly postponed, after which the original material returns, soulfully. The finale is an Allegro scherzando in C major. The strings play a rhythmic figure that builds to a staccato climax. The piano enters with a flourish, setting up the principal subject—again, as before in I, motivic rather than tuneful, but admirably constructed for developing. This is followed by another of Rachmaninov's signature melodies, lushly undulant, sung by the solo oboe and strings. (In the postwar 1940s, this was garnished with words and performed unrelentingly by big-band vandals as Full Moon and Empty Arms). A fugato brings back the principal subject, followed by a Maestoso statement of "The Tune." Accelerating fistfuls of piano chords set up a crowd-rousing conclusion. es
dc.description.tableofcontents Piano Concertos No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18; Moderato, Adagio sostenuto, Allegro scherzando -- Piano concerto No. 3 in D minor, op. 30; Allegro ma non tanto, Itermezzo Adagio, Finale Alla breve -- es
dc.format.medium 1 CD-Rom. (79:34 min.) Digital; 4 3/4 plg. es
dc.language.iso en es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M.Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 318371005 es
dc.subject.lcsh Música para piano -- Discos compactos. Conciertos (Piano con orquesta) -- Discos compactos. Piano con orquesta -- Discos compactos. es
dc.title Piano concertos 2 and 3 es
dc.title.alternative Complete solo piano music and concertos es
dc.title.alternative Musica para piano es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder HNH International Ltd. es
dc.identifier.classification 636943437629 es
dc.subject.cdu R.08 es


Files in this item

Files Length Size Format View Description
1. Piano Cocert ... inor, Op. 18- Moderato.mp3 12:01 10.98Mb Unknown mp3
2. Piano Cocert ... . 18- Adagio sostenuto.mp3 11:15 10.28Mb Unknown mp3
3. Piano Cocert ... 18- Allegro scherzando.mp3 12:00 10.96Mb Unknown mp3
4. Piano Cocert ... - Allegro ma non tanto.mp3 17:58 16.42Mb Unknown mp3
5. Piano Cocert ... 30- Intermezzo- Adagio.mp3 11:38 10.62Mb Unknown mp3
6. Piano Cocert ... 30- Finale- Alla breve.mp3 14:30 13.24Mb Unknown mp3
Piano Cocerto N ... inor, Op. 18- Completo.wav 35:10 354.9Mb WAV audio wav
Piano Cocerto N ... inor, Op. 30- Completo.wav 44:00 444.1Mb WAV audio wav

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record