String Quartet in D major (1897) : Chamber Symphony No. 1 Op. 9 : Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra (1933)

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String Quartet in D major (1897) : Chamber Symphony No. 1 Op. 9 : Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra (1933)

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dc.contributor.other Arnold Schoenberg es
dc.contributor.other Janneke van der Meer es
dc.contributor.other Wim de Jong es
dc.contributor.other Henk Guittart es
dc.contributor.other Viola de Hoog es
dc.contributor.other Schoenberg Quartet es
dc.contributor.other Susan Narucki es
dc.contributor.other Jan Erik van Regteren Altena es
dc.contributor.other Taco Kooistra es
dc.contributor.other Sepp Grotenhuis es
dc.contributor.other Michael Grandage es
dc.contributor.other Arnhem Philharmonic Orchestra es
dc.contributor.other Roberto Benzi es
dc.coverage.spatial Amsterdam, The Netherlands es
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-29T06:10:05Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-29T06:10:05Z
dc.date.copyright 2001 es
dc.date.issued 2012-07-29
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1896
dc.description.abstract Arnold Schoenberg remains one of the most controversial figures in the history of music. From the final years of the nineteenth century to the period following the World War II, Schoenberg produced music of great stylistic diversity, inspiring fanatical devotion from students, admiration from peers like Mahler, Strauss, and Busoni, riotous anger from conservative Viennese audiences, and unmitigated hatred from his many detractors. Born in Vienna on 13 September 1874, into a family that was not particularly musical, Schoenberg was largely self-taught as a musician. An amateur cellist, he demonstrated from early age a particular aptitude for composition. He received rudimentary instruction in harmony and counterpoint from Oskar Adler and studied composition briefly with Alexander Zemlinsky, his eventual brother-in-law. Early in his career, Schoenberg took jobs orchestrating operettas, but most of his life was spent teaching, both privately and at various institutions, and composing. His moves between teaching jobs were as much a result of seeking respite from the bouts of ill health which hampered him as they were due to his being offered a position. The composer's early works bear the unmistakable stamp of high German Romanticism, perhaps nowhere more evident than in his first important composition, Verklärte Nacht, Op. 4 (1899). With works like the Five Orchestral Pieces (1909) and the epochal Pierrot lunaire (1912), Schoenberg embarked upon one of the most influential phases of his career. Critics reviled this "atonal" (Schoenberg preferred "pantonal") music, whose structure does not include traditional tonality. Still, the high drama and novel expressive means of Schoenberg's music also inspired a faithful and active following. Most notable among Schoenberg's disciples were Alban Berg and Anton Webern, both of whom eventually attained stature equal to that of their famous mentor. These three composers—the principal figures of the so-called Second Viennese School—were the central force in the development of atonal and 12-tone music in the first half of the twentieth century and beyond. Schoenberg's Suite for Piano (1921-1923) occupies a place of central importance in the composer's catalogue as his first completely 12-tone composition. Though the 12-tone technique represents only a single, and by no means predominant, aspect of the composer's style, it remains the single characteristic mostly closely associated with his music. Schoenberg made repeated, though varied, use of the technique across the spectrum of genres, from chamber works like the String Quartet No. 4 (1936) and the Fantasy for Violin and Piano (1949) to orchestral works like the Violin Concerto (1935-1936) and the Piano Concerto (1942), to choral works like A Survivor from Warsaw (1947). Schoenberg fled the poisonous political atmosphere of Europe in 1933 and spent the remainder of his life primarily in the United States, becoming a naturalized citizen in 1941. During this phase of his career, he at times returned to frank tonality, as in the Theme and Variations for band (1943), reaffirming his connection to the great German musical heritage that extended back to Bach. For Schoenberg, the dissolution of tonality was a logical and inevitable step in the evolution of Western music. Despite a steady stream of critical brickbats throughout his entire career, the composer, whose life inspired one of twentieth century's great novels, Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus, persisted in his aims, insisting that his music was the result of an overwhelming creative impulse. Though debate over the man and his music rages on, Schoenberg is today acknowledged as one of the most significant figures in music history. The composer, a well-known triskaidekaphobe, died in Los Angeles, CA, on July 13, 1951. © AMG, All Music Guide es
dc.description.tableofcontents CD 5-- String Quartet in D major (1897) ; I Allegro molto, II Intermezzo Andantino grazioso, III Andante con moto, IV Allegro (Presto)-- Chamber Symphony No. 1 Op. 9 (1906) arranged by Anton Webern for piano and string quartet (1922-3) ; Langsam (Sehr rasch), Sehr rasch, Viel Langsamer aber doch fießend, Viel langsamer, Schwungvoll-- Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra (1933) in B flat major after the Concerto grosso Op. 6 No. 7 ; Largo (Allegro), Largo, Allegretto grazioso, Hornpipe (Moderato)-- es
dc.format.medium 1 CD Rom (68 min., 52 seg) : Stereo 4 3/4 plg es
dc.language.iso en_US es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 48210473 es
dc.subject.lcsh String Quartets, Symphonies (Piano Quintet), Concertos (String Quartet) es
dc.title String Quartet in D major (1897) : Chamber Symphony No. 1 Op. 9 : Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra (1933) es
dc.title.alternative Cuarteto de Cuerdas en D mayor (1897) : Sinfonía de Cámara No. 1 Op. 9 : Concierto para Cuarteto de Cuerdas y Orquesta (1933) es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder Chandos Records Ltd es
dc.identifier.classification 095115993927 es
dc.subject.cdu Scho.03 es


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Files Length Size Format View Description
1. String Quart ... 897) - I Allegro molto.mp3 9:13 12.64Mb Unknown mp3
2. String Quart ... zzo Andantino grazioso.mp3 4:48 6.591Mb Unknown mp3
3. String Quart ... - III Andante con moto.mp3 7:52 10.80Mb Unknown mp3
4. String Quart ... - IV Allegro (Presto).mp3 5:00 6.871Mb Unknown mp3
5 al 9. Chamber ... p. 9 (1906) - Completo.wav 20:44 209.3Mb WAV audio wav
10. Concerto fo ... o. 7 - Largo (Allegro).mp3 5:06 6.989Mb Unknown mp3
11. Concerto fo ... so Op. 6 No. 7 - Largo.mp3 3:17 4.512Mb Unknown mp3
12. Concerto fo ... - Allegretto grazioso.mp3 6:47 9.302Mb Unknown mp3
13. Concerto fo ... - Hornpipe (Moderato).mp3 5:54 8.085Mb Unknown mp3
String Quartet in D major (1897) - Completo.wav 26:44 269.8Mb WAV audio wav
Concerto for St ... Op. 6 No. 7 - Completo.wav 20:56 211.2Mb WAV audio wav

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