Luisa Miller

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Luisa Miller

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dc.contributor.other Giuseppe Verdi es
dc.contributor.other Montserrat Caballé es
dc.contributor.other Luciano Pavarotti es
dc.contributor.other Sherril Milnes es
dc.contributor.other Bonaldo Giaiotti es
dc.contributor.other Richard Van Allan es
dc.contributor.other Anna Reynolds es
dc.contributor.other Annette Céline es
dc.contributor.other Fernando Pavarotti es
dc.contributor.other London Opera Chorus es
dc.contributor.other National Philharmonic Orchestra es
dc.contributor.other Peter Maag es
dc.contributor.other Salvatore Cammarano es
dc.coverage.spatial London, England es
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-06T13:58:18Z
dc.date.available 1976
dc.date.available 2012-11-06T13:58:18Z
dc.date.copyright 2007
dc.date.issued 2012-11-06
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2497
dc.description.abstract Giuseppe Verdi was to opera in the Italian tradition what Beethoven was to the symphony. When he arrived on the scene some had suggested that effective opera after Rossini was not possible. Verdi, however, took the form to new heights of drama and musical expression. Partisans see him as at least the equal of Wagner, even though his style and musical persona were of an entirely different cast. In the end, both Verdi's popular vein—as heard in the operas Rigoletto, Il trovatore, and La traviata—and his deeper side—found in Aida, Otello, and Falstaff—demonstrate his mastery and far-reaching development of Italian opera. Verdi showed talent by the age of seven and even played organ at a local church. Around this time he was given an old piano, which he quickly learned to play with proficiency. He moved to Busseto in 1823 and began study the following year with Ferdinando Provesi. By age 15 he had become an assistant church organist and had already started composing. Beginning in 1832, he studied privately with Vincenzo Lavigna in Milan, after the Conservatory there turned him away. He returned to Busseto and married Margherita Barezzi in 1836. Having achieved publication of some songs, he moved to Milan in 1839 and composed his first opera, Oberto. It was a success, though his next effort, Un giorno di regno, was an abject failure. Worse, Verdi's wife died during its composition. (Their two children had died in the previous two years.) Stunned and depressed, the composer struggled on to rebound with Nabucco (1842) and I lombardi (1843). Macbeth, Luisa Miller, and other operas came in the 1840s, most with great success. Around 1847, Verdi developed a relationship with soprano Giuseppina Strepponi and the two lived together for many years on Verdi's farm, Sant'Agata, before finally marrying in 1859. In the period 1851-1853, the composer wrote three of his most popular operas. Rigoletto (1851) and Il trovatore (1853) were instant successes, but La traviata (1853) was a disappointment at its premiere, though a year later, with minor revisions, it was warmly received. After an extended excursion to Paris in 1853, Verdi returned to Busseto and turned out Simon Boccanegra (1857) and Un ballo in maschera (1859), both embroiling him in politics, an activity he was already immersed in, since he served in the local parliament and later in national parliament as senator. In St. Petersburg, Verdi's La forza del destino premiered in 1862 and Don Carlos in Paris in 1867. Having relocated to Genoa, Verdi composed Aida in the years 1870-1871. Its Cairo premiere in 1871 was a success, but the composer then gave up opera, at least for a time. His String Quartet (1873) and Requiem (1874) showed his creative juices were still very much alive. His next opera, Otello, came finally in 1886, Verdi working slowly and getting sidetracked revising earlier operas. One more opera came from his pen, Falstaff, in 1893, which scored a stunning success. Critical opinion has it that his last three operas are his finest, that the elderly composer became bolder and more imaginative in his later years. In these later years, Verdi also worked to found a hospital and, in Milan, a home for retired musicians. In 1897, Giuseppina Verdi died and the composer thereafter lived at the Grand Hotel in Milan, finding companionship with retired soprano Teresa Stolz. A year later, his Quatro pezzi sacri premiered in Paris. This would be the composer's last work. On January 21, 1901, Verdi suffered a stroke and died six days later. © Robert Cummings, All Music Guide es
dc.description.tableofcontents CD1-- Sinfonia-- Act One ; Scene I : Ti desta Luisa regina de’cori…Ecco mia figlia (Laura, Miller, Luisa, Cantadine, Cantadini), Non temer...Lo vidi e ‘l primo palpito...Ah!...Mia diletta! (Luisa, Laura, Rodolfo, Miller, Cantadine, Cantadini), T’amo d’amor ch’esprimere mal tenterebbe il detto!, Ferma ed ascolta...Sacra la scelta è d’un consorte (Wurm, Miller), Scene II : Che mai narrasti!...Il mio sangue la vita darei (Walter, Wurm), Padre...M’abbraccia...Taci...è la Dechessa...Quale un sorriso d’amica sorte (Rodolfo, Walter, Federica, damigelle, Paggi, Familiari, Arcieri), Duchessa...Dall’aule raggianti di vano splendor (Rodolfo, Federica), Scene III : Sciogliete i levrieri...O padre mio! (Cacciatori, Luisa, Miller), Del Conte di Walter figlio qual comanda il padre...Tu signor fra queste soglie! (Miller, Luisa, Rodolfo, Walter, Laura, Arcieri, Cantadine, Cantadini), Fra’ mortali ancora oppressa non è tanto l’innocenza (Miller, Rodolfo, Walter, Luisa, Laura, Cantadine, Cantadini, Arcieri)-- Act Two ; Scene I : Ah! Luisa Luisa ove sei?...Al villaggio dai campi tornando (Cantadine, Cantadini, Laura, Luisa), Il padre tuo...Tu puniscimi o Signore (Wurm, Luisa)-- CD2-- Qui nulla s’attenta imporre al tuo core...A brani a brani o perfido (Wurm, Luisa), Scene II : Egli delira...L’alto retaggio non ho bramato (Walter, Wurm), Vien la Duchessa...Pressentarti alla Duchessa puoi Luisa (Wurm, Federica, Walter, LuisA), Scene III : Il foglio dunque?...Oh! fede negar potessi agli occhi miei! (Rodolfo, un cantadio), Quando le sere al placido chiaror d’un ciel stellato (Rodolfo), Di me chiedeste?...L’ara o l’avello apprestami (Wurm, Rodolfo, Walter, Armigeri, Familiari)-- Act Tree ; Come in un giorno solo...Luisa!...figlia mia! (Laura, Luisa, Miller, Cantadine), Pallida...mesta sei! (Miller, Luisa), Sotto al mio pi’e il suol vacilla!...La tomba è un letto sparso di fiori...Andrem raminghi e poveri (Miller, Luisa), Ah! L’ultima preghiera in questo caro suolo (Luisa, Rodolfo), M’ardon le vene...Piangi piangi...Quai grida intesi? (Rodolfo, Luisa, Miller), Padre...ricevi l’esteremo...addio...(Luisa, Miller, Rodolfo, Walter, Cantadini, Cantadine)-- es
dc.format.extent CD 1 (69:03 min) ; CD 2 (74:35 min) es
dc.format.medium 2 CD-Rom : Stereo ; 4 3/4 plg. es
dc.language.iso en_US es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 166263100 es
dc.subject.lcsh Operas es
dc.title Luisa Miller es
dc.title.alternative Luisa Miller Opera in Three Acts es
dc.title.alternative Luisa Miller Ópera en Tres Actos es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder Decca Music Group Limited es
dc.identifier.classification 028947584964 es
dc.subject.cdu Ve.11 es


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Files Length Size Format View Description
Luisa Miller - Sinfonia.wav 5:35 56.36Mb WAV audio wav
Luisa Miller - Act One 'Love'.wav 54:37 551.3Mb WAV audio wav
Luisa Miller- Act Two 'Intrigue'.wav 42:34 429.6Mb WAV audio wav
Luisa Miller - Act Three 'Poison'.wav 41:15 416.4Mb WAV audio wav

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