Atys

DSpace Repository

Atys

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.other Jean-Baptiste Lully es
dc.contributor.other La Simphonie du Marai es
dc.contributor.other Hugo Reyne es
dc.contributor.other Le Chœur du Marais es
dc.contributor.other Philippe Quinault es
dc.coverage.spatial Paris, France. es
dc.date.accessioned 2013-01-21T19:54:14Z
dc.date.available 2010
dc.date.available 2013-01-21T19:54:14Z
dc.date.copyright 2010
dc.date.issued 2013-01-21
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2592
dc.description.abstract Atys, Lully's fourth full-length opera (or tragédie en musique), was first performed at the theater at St. Germain-en-Laye on January 10, 1676. The first public performance took place at the Paris Opéra in April that year. For reasons that have not been established, it became known as "the king's opera." More importantly, it marked a major development in the history of the tragédie en musique as established by Lully and his regular librettist Philippe Quinault. In their earlier collaborations—Cadmus et Hermione, Alceste, and Thésée—Lully and Quinault, while aspiring to the pure style of French Classical lyric theater, had not totally abandoned certain elements of Venetian opera, with its subplots and burlesque characters. Atys marks the beginning of a new phase in which all extraneous elements are purged in order to concentrate on the drama of the central plot. This was achieved without foregoing the brilliance of spectacle which formed an integral part of part of French opera. As with all of Quinault's librettos for Lully (11 in all), the story is drawn from classical literature—in this case from Ovid's Fasti. It tells of the tragic love of Atys and the gentle river nymph Sangaride; their love is doomed by the opposition of Cybèle, Queen of the Gods, who also loves Atys. In the powerful and tragic denouement of the opera, Atys, driven temporarily mad by Cybèle, stabs Sangaride. Overcome with remorse when restored to sanity, Atys tries to kill himself, but is restrained by Cybèle, who instead transforms the stricken lover into a pine tree. Thus she too loses the man she loves. The opera ends in tragic mourning—a tone unique among Lully's operas and rare among seventeenth and eighteenth century operas, which, however tragically structured, invariably turn at the last to a satisfying happy ending. Atys follows the tradition of tragédie en musique by being cast in five acts prefaced by a prologue. As was customary, the Prologue introduces a series of allegorical characters whose principal function is the glorification of Louis XIV, here praised as a hero by Time and a chorus of the Hours of Night and Day. Unlike Italian opera of this period, from which the chorus had disappeared, the chorus plays a major role not only in the prologue, but as participants in the drama itself. The chorus also allows for another essential feature of French operas, namely dance passages, which form the centerpiece of the divertissements introduced into each act. Atys includes one of the most famous of all Lully's divertissements: the famous sommeil (or sleep scene) (Act Three) in which Cybèle invokes the god of Sleep to announce her love to Atys in a dream, contrasting the pleasant dreams that he will experience if he returns her love with the nightmare of the baleful dreams he will suffer if he rejects her. © Brian Robins, Rovi es
dc.description.tableofcontents CD 1-- Prologue ; Ouverture, Le Temps : “En vain, j’ai respecté”, Choeur des Heures : “Ses justes lois”, Air pour les nymphes de Flore (rondeau), Le Temps : “La saison des frimas”, Flore :”Quand j’attends les beaux jours”, Flore et Le Temps : “Le plaisirs à ses yeux”, Choeurs des Heures : “Rien ne peut l’arréter”, Air pour la suite de Flore (gavotte), Un Zéphyr : “Le printemps quelquefois”, Prélude pour Melpomène. Melpomène : “Retirez-vous”, Air pour la suite de Melpomène, Ritournelle. Iris : “Cybèle veut que Flore”, Choeur des Heures : “Preparez de nouvelles fétes”, Menuet, Ouverture (reprise)-- Acte I ; Sècene I. Ritournelle. Atys : “Allons, allons, accourez tous”, Scène II. Atys et Idas : “Allons, allons, accourez tous”, Idas : “Adys, ne feignez plus”, Scène III. Sangaride et Doris : “Allons, allons, accourez tous”, Atys : “L’amour fait trop verser de pleurs”, Scène IV. Sangaride : “Atys est trop heureux”, Sangaride : “J’aime Atys en secret”, Scène V. Atys : “On voit dans ces campagnes”, Scène VI. Atys : “Sangaride, ce jour est un grand jour pour vous”, Atys : “Non, rien ne me peut secourir”, Sangaride : “C’est peu de perdre en moi”, Sangaride et Atus : “Mais déjà de ce mont sacré”, Atys : “Quittez votre cour immortelle”, Entrée des Phrygiens, Second air des Phrygiens (rondeau), Scène VIII Prélude. Cybèle : “Venez tous dans mon temple”, Cybèle : “Vous devez vous animer”. es
dc.format.extent 55 : 54 min. es
dc.format.medium 1 CD Rom (55 min., 54 seg.) : Stereo ; 4 3/4 plg es
dc.language.iso fr es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M. Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 708413702 es
dc.subject.lcsh Operas ; Attis (God) -- Drama. es
dc.title Atys es
dc.language.rfc3066 fre es
dc.rights.holder Conseil Général de la Vendée es
dc.identifier.classification 3760156050089 es
dc.subject.cdu Lu.05 es


Files in this item

Files Length Size Format View Description
Prologue-Completo.wav 17:57 181.1Mb WAV audio Wav
Acte I-Completo.wav 35:49 361.5Mb WAV audio Wav

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record