A Gottschalk Festival

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A Gottschalk Festival

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dc.contributor.other Louis Moreau Gottschalk es
dc.contributor.other Eugene List es
dc.contributor.other Vienna State Opera Orchestre es
dc.contributor.other Berlin Symphony Orchestra es
dc.contributor.other Igor Buketoff es
dc.contributor.other Samuel Adler es
dc.contributor.other Trinidad Paniagua es
dc.contributor.other Jose Alberto Esteves es
dc.contributor.other Pablo Garcia es
dc.contributor.other Cary Lewis es
dc.contributor.other Brady Millican es
dc.date.accessioned 2013-05-20T22:13:17Z
dc.date.available 1990
dc.date.available 2013-05-20T22:13:17Z
dc.date.copyright 1990
dc.date.issued 2013-05-20
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2925
dc.description.abstract Gottschalk was the eldest son of a Jewish-English New Orleans real estate speculator and his French-descended bride. Gottschalk may have heard the drums at Place Congo in New Orleans, but his exposure to Creole melody likely came through his own household; his mother had grown up in Haiti and fled to Louisiana after that island's slave uprising. Piano study was undertaken with Narcisse Lettellier, and at age 11, Gottschalk was sent to Paris. Denied entrance to the Conservatoire, he continued with Charles Hallé and Camille Stamaty, adding composition with Pierre Maleden. His Paris debut at the Salle Pleyel in 1845 earned praise from Chopin. By the end of the 1840s, Gottschalk's first works, such as Bamboula, appeared. These syncopated pieces based on popular Creole melodies rapidly gained popularity worldwide. Gottschalk left Paris in 1852 to join his father in New York, only to encounter stiff competition from touring foreign artists. With his father's death in late 1853, Gottschalk inherited support of his mother and six siblings. In 1855, he signed a contract with publisher William Hall to issue several pieces, including The Banjo and The Last Hope. The Last Hope is a sad and sweetly melancholy piece, and it proved hugely popular. Gottschalk found himself obliged to repeat it at every concert, and wrote "even my paternal love for The Last Hope has succumbed under the terrible necessity of meeting it at every step." With an appearance at Dodsworth Hall in December 1855, Gottschalk finally found his audience. For the first time he was solvent, and at his mother's death in 1857 Gottschalk was released from his familial obligations. He embarked on a tour of the Caribbean and didn't return for five years. When this ended, America was in the midst of Civil War. Gottschalk supported the north, touring Union states until 1864. Gottschalk wearied of the horrors surrounding him, becoming an avid proponent of education, playing benefit concerts for public schools and libraries. During a tour to California in 1865, Gottschalk entered into an involvement with a young woman attending a seminary school in Oakland, and the press excoriated him. He escaped on a steamer bound for Panama City. Instead of returning to New York, he pressed on to Peru, Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina, staying one step ahead of revolutions, rioting, and cholera epidemics, but he began to break down under the strain. Gottschalk contracted malaria in Brazil in August 1869; still recovering, he was hit in the abdomen by a sandbag thrown by a student in São Paolo. In a concert at Rio de Janeiro on November 25, Gottschalk collapsed at the keyboard. He had appendicitis, which led to peritonitis. On December 18, 1869, Gottschalk died at the age of 40. The impact of Gottschalk's music on the later development of ragtime might seem obvious, yet there is no proven link from him to the syncopated popular music he anticipated in works like Bamboula. The music of Scott Joplin and Jelly Roll Morton show traces of Gottschalk's melodic shape and rhythmic pulse, and the New Orleans-born Morton likewise studied under Lettellier. Nickelodeon pianists disserviced Gottschalk by loving him too well; pieces like The Dying Poet and Morte!! turned many a dramatic corner in silent movie houses, and the public began to identify these themes as cliché. By the 1940s, Gottschalk was condemned as hopelessly old-fashioned, and it would take decades of work by scholars to improve his critical fortunes. In his best music, Gottschalk was an American original; masterpieces like Souvenir de Porto Rico, Union, and O ma charmant, épargnez-moi! transcend time through their emotional power, technical mastery, audacity, wit, and charm. © Uncle Dave Lewis, All Music Guide es
dc.description.tableofcontents CD1-- Grande Tarantelle for Piano & Orchestra (RO 259)-- Symphony No. 2 “A Montevideo” (RO 257)-- “The Union” Concert Paraphrase on National Airs (RO 269)-- Marche Solennelle (RO 154)-- Five Pieces for Piano four hands-- Radieuse Grande valse de concert (RO 217)-- Ses Yeux Polka de concert (RO 234)-- La Gallina Danse cubaine (RO 100)-- Ojos Criollos Danse cubaine (RO 184)-- Pasquinade Caprice (RO 189)-- CD2-- Grande Fantaisie Triomphale sur L’Hymne National Bresilien Op. 69-- Marcha Triunfal y Final de Opera for Orchestra & Band (RO 157)-- Symphony No. 1 “La Nuit des Tropiques” (RO 255) ; Andante, Allegro moderato-- Variations on the Portuguese National Hymn for Piano & Orchestra (RO 289)-- Escenas Campestres (Cuban Country Scenes) Opera in one Act (RO 77)-- es
dc.format.extent CD 1 (58:47 min) ; CD 2 (62:06 min) es
dc.format.medium 2 CD-Rom : Stereo ; 4 3/4 plg. es
dc.language.iso en_US es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 22871360 es
dc.subject.lcsh Piano with Orchestra, Symphonies, Piano with Orchestra, Orchestral music, Operas, Piano music (4 hands) es
dc.title A Gottschalk Festival es
dc.title.alternative El Festival de Gottschalk es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder The Moss Music Group es
dc.identifier.classification 04716350092 es
dc.subject.cdu Gott.01 es


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Files Length Size Format View Description
1. Grande Taran ... o & Orchestra (RO 259).wav 7:40 77.33Mb WAV audio wav
2. Symphony No. 2 “A Montevideo” (RO 257).wav 12:12 123.2Mb WAV audio wav
3. “The Union” ... National Airs (RO 269).wav 7:52 79.40Mb WAV audio wav
4. Marche Solennelle (RO 154).wav 9:42 97.83Mb WAV audio wav
5. Radieuse Grande valse de concert (RO 217).wav 5:16 53.22Mb WAV audio wav
6. Yeux Polka de concert (RO 234).wav 6:49 68.76Mb WAV audio wav
7. La Gallina Danse cubaine (RO 100).wav 2:34 25.85Mb WAV audio wav
8. Ojos Criollos Danse cubaine (RO 184).wav 2:42 27.19Mb WAV audio wav
9. Pasquinade Caprice (RO 189).wav 3:45 37.90Mb WAV audio wav
1. Grande Fanta ... ional Bresilien Op. 69.wav 9:34 96.56Mb WAV audio wav
2. Marcha Triun ... hestra & Band (RO 157).wav 9:03 91.27Mb WAV audio wav
3. Symphony No. ... es” (RO 255) - Andante.mp3 13:00 17.82Mb MPEG Audio wav
4. Symphony No. ... 55) - Allegro moderato.mp3 7:02 9.650Mb MPEG Audio mp3
5. Variations o ... o & Orchestra (RO 289).wav 9:41 97.66Mb WAV audio wav
6. Escenas Camp ... era in one Act (RO 77).wav 13:26 135.6Mb WAV audio wav
Symphony No. 1 ... s” (RO 255) - Completo.wav 19:59 201.6Mb WAV audio wav

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