Wagner Complete Operas

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Wagner Complete Operas

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dc.contributor.other Richard Wagner es
dc.contributor.other John Mitchinson es
dc.contributor.other April Cantelo es
dc.contributor.other Lorna Haywood es
dc.contributor.other Tom McDonnell es
dc.contributor.other Richard Greager es
dc.contributor.other Paul Hudson es
dc.contributor.other Teresa Cahill es
dc.contributor.other Elizabeth Gale es
dc.contributor.other Della Jones es
dc.contributor.other Don Garrard es
dc.contributor.other Jolyon Dodgson es
dc.contributor.other BBC Northern Singers es
dc.contributor.other Stephen Wilkinson es
dc.contributor.other BBC Northern Symphony Orchestra es
dc.contributor.other Barry Griffths es
dc.contributor.other Jeffrey Tate es
dc.contributor.other Sir Edward Downes es
dc.coverage.spatial Manchester, England es
dc.date.accessioned 2013-07-09T17:09:04Z
dc.date.available 2012
dc.date.available 2013-07-09T17:09:04Z
dc.date.copyright 2012
dc.date.issued 2013-07-09
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3445
dc.description.abstract Richard Wagner was one of the most revolutionary figures in the history of music, a composer who made pivotal contributions to the development of harmony and musical drama that reverberate even today. Indeed, though Wagner occasionally produced successful music written on a relatively modest scale, opera—the bigger, the better—was clearly his milieu, and his aesthetic is perhaps the most grandiose that Western music has ever known. Early in his career, Wagner learned both the elements and the practical, political realities of his craft by writing a handful of operas which were unenthusiastically, even angrily, received. Beginning with Rienzi (1838-40) and The Flying Dutchman (1841), however, he enjoyed a string of successes that propelled him to immortality and changed the face of music. His monumental Ring cycle of four operas—Das Rheingold (1853-54), Die Walküre (1854-56), Siegfried (1856-71) and Götterdämmerung (1869-74)—remains the most ambitious and influential contribution by any composer to the opera literature. Tristan and Isolde (1857-59) is perhaps the most representative example of Wagner's musical style, which is characterized by a high degree of chromaticism, a restless, searching tonal instability, lush harmonies, and the association of specific musical elements (known as leitmotifs, the flexible manipulation of which is one of the glories of Wagner's music) with certain characters and plot points. Wagner wrote text as well as music for all his operas, which he preferred to call "music dramas." Wagner's life matched his music for sheer drama. Born in Leipzig on May 22, 1813, he began in the early 1830s to write prolifically on music and the arts in general; over his whole career, his music would to some degree serve to demonstrate his aesthetic theories. He often worked as a conductor in his early years; a conducting engagement took him to Riga, Latvia, in 1837, but he fled the country in the middle of the night two years later to elude creditors. Wagner as a young man had some sympathy with the revolutionary movements of the middle nineteenth century (and even the Ring cycle contains a distinct anti-materialist and vaguely socialist drift); in the Dresden uprisings of 1849 he apparently took up arms, and he had to leave Germany when the police restored order. Settling in Zurich, Switzerland, he wrote little for some years but evolved the intellectual framework for his towering mature masterpieces. Wagner returned to Germany in 1864 under the protection and patronage of King Ludwig II of Bavaria; it was in Bayreuth, near Munich, that he undertook the construction of an opera house (completed in 1876) built to his personal specifications and suited to the massive fusion of music, staging, text, and scene design that his later operas entailed. Bayreuth became something of a shrine for the fanatical Wagnerites who carried the torch after his death; it remains the goal of many a pilgrimage today. His attitude toward Jews was deeply ambivalent (he believed, mistakenly, that his stepfather was Jewish), but some of his writings contain anti-Semitic elements that have aroused considerable controversy among opera lovers, especially in view of Adolf Hitler's apparent predilection for the composer's music. © AMG, All Music Guide es
dc.description.tableofcontents CD1-- Ouvertüre-- Act One ; “Schwinget euch auf” (Chor), “Warum Zemina seh’ ich dich so trauring? (Farzana, Zemina, Chor), „Was seh‘ ich? Morald ihr und Gunther du? (Gernot, Morald, Gunther), „Wo find‘ ich dich wo wird mir Trost?“ (Arindal), „Da steht ihr nun so recht bejammernswert!“ (Gernot, Arindal), „Arindal!“ – „O welch ehrwürdige Gestalt“ (Gunther, Arindal, Gernot, Morald), „So soll für immer ich nun von dir scheiden“ (Arindal), „Wie muss ich doch beklagen“ (Ada), „Wo bin ich? Ach in welche sel’ge Räume“ (Arindal, Ada), „Auf Arindal komm jetzt mit uns von hinnen!“ (Morald, Gunther, Gernot, Chor, Arindal, Ada), „Dein Vater hat das Los“ (Farzana, Zemina, Chor, Ada, Gunther, Morald, Gernot, Arindal)-- CD2-- Act Two ; „Weh uns wir sind geschlagen“ (Chor, Lora), „O musst du Hoffnung schwinden“ (Lora), „Heil Euch! Ich bringe frohe Kunde“ (Bote, Chor, Lora), „O König sei gergrüß von deinem Volk!“ (Chor, Arindal, Morald, Lora), „Wie ist dir’sGunther (Gernot, Gunther), „Wie? Seh ich recht?“ (Drolla, Gernot), „O Grausame! So habt ihr kein Erbarmen“ (Ada, Farzana, Zemina), „Weh mir so nah‘ die fürchterliche Stunde“ (Ada), „Hort ihr des Sturmes Brausen“ (Lora, Drolla, Arindal, Gunther, Morald, Gernot, Chor, Ada), „O seht die holden Kleine“ (Lora, Drolla, Gunther, Chor, Gernot, Arinda, Ada), „Entflieht wir sind besiegt!“ (Chor, Lora, Drolla, Arindal, Gunther, Gernot, Ada), „Weh euch! Ich bringe nichts!“ (Harald, Lora, Drolla, Arindal, Gunther, Gernot, Chor, Ada), „Ada die Bande sind gelöst“ (Zemina, Farzana, Lora, Drolla, Arindal, Gunther, Gernot, Chor, Ada), „Nun denn du kennst mein Los!“ (Ada, Arindal, Chor, Morald, Lora, Drolla, Gunther, Gernot, Zemina, Farzana)-- CD3— Act Three ; “Heil sei dem holden Frieden” (Chor), “Genug o endet dieser Feste Jubel!” (Morald, Lora, Drolla, Gunther, Gernot), „Hallo! Lasst halle Hunde los!“ (Arindal), „Mein Gatte Arindal“ (Ada, Groma), „So wäre uns’re Ada denn gerettet“ (Farzana, Zemina), „Auf! Erwache Arindal!“ (Zemina, Farzana, Arinadal),“Ihr Geister auf bewachet treu“ (chor, Arindal, Farzama, Zemina, Gromas Stimme), „Allmächtiger wei trag‘ ich diesen Anblick!“ (Arindal, Zemina, Farzana, Chor, Gromas Stimme), „O ihr des Busens Hochgefühle“ (Arindal, Ada, Feenkönig, Chor, Farzana, Zemina)-- es
dc.format.extent CD 1 (80:34 min) ; CD 2 (64:35 min) ; CD 3 (54:35 min) es
dc.format.medium 3 CD-Rom : Stereo ; 4 3/4 plg es
dc.language.iso en_US es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 820126961 es
dc.subject.lcsh Operas es
dc.title Wagner Complete Operas es
dc.title.alternative Wagner Die Opern es
dc.title.alternative Wagner Intégrale Des Opéras es
dc.title.alternative Wagner Óperas Completas es
dc.title.alternative Die Feen es
dc.title.alternative The Fairies es
dc.title.alternative Les Fées es
dc.title.alternative Las Hadas es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder Deutsche Grammophon GmbH es
dc.identifier.classification 028947905028 es
dc.subject.cdu W.09 es


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Die Feen - Act I.wav 1:09:08 697.8Mb WAV audio wav
Die Feen - Act II.wav 1:04:32 651.3Mb WAV audio wav
Die Feen - Act III.wav 54:31 550.3Mb WAV audio wav

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