Susanna HWV 66

DSpace Repository

Susanna HWV 66

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.other George Frideric Handel es
dc.contributor.other Ruth Holton es
dc.contributor.other Elisabeth von Magnus es
dc.contributor.other Sytse Buwalda es
dc.contributor.other John Elwes es
dc.contributor.other Tom Sol es
dc.contributor.other Kölner Kammerchor es
dc.contributor.other Peter Neumann es
dc.contributor.other Collegium Cartusianum es
dc.coverage.spatial Germany es
dc.date.accessioned 2013-08-02T15:41:35Z
dc.date.available 1999
dc.date.available 2013-08-02T15:41:35Z
dc.date.copyright 1999
dc.date.issued 2013-08-02
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3585
dc.description.abstract Most music lovers have encountered George Frederick Handel through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio of Christ's life and death, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. Handel was born in the German city of Halle on February 23, 1685. His father noted but did not nurture his musical talent, and he had to sneak a small keyboard instrument into his attic to practice. As a child he studied music with Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow, organist at the Liebfrauenkirche, and for a time he seemed destined for a career as a church organist himself. After studying law briefly at the University of Halle, Handel began serving as organist on March 13, 1702, at the Domkirche there. Dissatisfied, he took a post as violinist in the Hamburg opera orchestra in 1703, and his frustration with musically provincial northern Germany was perhaps shown when he fought a duel the following year with the composer Matheson over the accompaniment to one of Matheson's operas. In 1706 Handel took off for Italy, then the font of operatic innovation, and mastered contemporary trends in Italian serious opera. He returned to Germany to become court composer in Hannover, whose rulers were linked by family ties with the British throne; his patron there, the Elector of Hannover, became King George I of England. English audiences took to his 1711 opera Rinaldo, and several years later Handel jumped at the chance to move to England permanently. He impressed King George early on with the Water Music of 1716, written as entertainment for a royal boat outing. Through the 1720s Handel composed Italian operatic masterpieces for London stages: Ottone, Serse (Xerxes), and other works often based on classical stories. His popularity was dented, though, by new English-language works of a less formal character, and in the 1730s and 1740s Handel turned to the oratorio, a grand form that attracted England's new middle-class audiences. Not only Messiah but also Israel in Egypt, Samson, Saul, and many other works established him as a venerated elder of English music. The oratorios displayed to maximum effect Handel's melodic gift and the sense of timing he brought to big choral numbers. Among the most popular of all the oratorios was Judas Maccabeus, composed in 32 days in 1746. Handel presented the oratorio six times during its first season and about 40 times before his death 12 years later, conducting it 30 times himself. In 1737, Handel suffered a stroke, which caused both temporary paralysis in his right arm and some loss of his mental faculties, but he recovered sufficiently to carry on most normal activity. He was urged to write an autobiography, but never did. Blind in old age, he continued to compose. He died in London on April 14, 1759. Beethoven thought Handel the greatest of all his predecessors; he once said, "I would bare my head and kneel at his grave." © AMG, All Music Guide es
dc.description.tableofcontents CD1 Act I; Overture, Chorus How long (oh Lord! shall Israel groan), Recitative (Joacim) Our crimes, Air (Joacim) Clouds o'ertake the brightest day, Recitative (Susanna) Oh Joacim! When thour art by, Duet (Susanna, Joacim) When thou art nigh, Recitative (Chelsias) Lives there in Babylon, Air (Chelsias) Who fears the Lord, Recitative (Joacim) A flame like mine, Air (Susanna) Would custom bid the melting fair, Recitative (Joacim, Susanna) Source of each joy, Air (Joacim) The parent bird in search of food, Recitative (Susanna) On Joacim may ev'ry joy attend, Accompagnato (Susanna) What means this weight, Air (Susanna) Bending to the throne of glory, Accompagnato (1st Elder) Tyrannic love!, Air (1st Elder) Ye verdant hills, ye balmy vales, Recitative (2d Elder, 1st Elder) Say is it fit, Air (2d Elder) The oak that for a thousand years, Recitative (1st Elder, 2st Elder) Ye winged gales- convey, Air (1st Elder) When the trumpet sounds to arms, Chorus Righteous Heav'n-- CD2 Act II; Recitative (Joacim) Frost nips the flow'rs, Air (Joacim), On fair Euphrates' verdant side, Recitative (Susanna) Lead me, oh lead me, Air (Susanna) Crystal streams in murmurs flowing, Recitative (Susanna, Attendant) Too lovely youth, Air (Attendant) I ask yon damask rose be sweet, Recitative (Susanna, Attendant) In vain you try, Air (Attendant) Beneath the cypress gloomy shade, Recitative (Susanna, Attendant) Thy plaintive strains, Air (1st Elder) Blooming as the face of spring, Recitative (2st Elder, Susanna) We long have languish'd, Air (2d Elder) The torrent that sweeps, Recitative (Susanna, 2d Elder) Deceitful wolves!, Trio (Susanna, 1st Elder, 2s Elder) Away, Away!, Recitative (Susanna, 1st Elder, 2d Elder) Alas! I find the fatal toils are set, Air (Susanna) If guiltness blood be your intent, Chorus Let justice reign and flourish, Recitative (Joacim) Is fair Susanna false?, Air (Joacim) On the rapid whirlwind's wing, Chorus Oh Joacim! thy wedded truth-- CD3 Act III; Chorus The cause is decided, Recitative (Susanna) I hear my doom, Air (Susanna) Faith displays her rosy wing, Recitative (1st Elder) Permit me- fair, Air (1st Elder) Round thy urn my tears shall flow, Recitative (Susanna) 'Tis thus the crocodile, Accompagnato (Susanna) But you, who see me on the verge of life, Recitative (2ns & 1st Elder, Daniel) The sentence now is past, Air (Daniel) 'Tis not age's sullen face, Recitative (A Judge, Daniel) Oh wond'rous youth!, Chorus Impartial heav'n, Recitative (Daniel, 1st & 2nd Elder) Thou artful wretch!, Air (Daniel) Chastity thou Cherub bright, Recitative (Susanna) But see! my Lord, Air (Joacim) Gold within the furnace try'd, Recitative (Chelsias) The joyful news of chaste Susanna's truth, Air (Chelsias, Susanna) Raise your voice to sounds of joy, Chorus Bless'd be the day, Recitative (Susanna) Hence ev'ry pang, Air (Susanna) Guilt trembling spoke my doom, Recitative (Joacim) Sweet are the accents, Duet (Susanna, Joacim) To my chaste Susanna's praise, Chorus A virtuous wife-- es
dc.format.extent CD1 (60min; 06seg) : CD2 (51min; 39seg) : CD3 (46min; 03seg) es
dc.format.medium 3 CD-Rom. Stereo; 4 3/4 plg es
dc.language.iso en es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M.Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 44813168 es
dc.subject.lcsh Oratorios es
dc.title Susanna HWV 66 es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder MDG es
dc.identifier.classification 760623094526 es
dc.subject.cdu H.17 es


Files in this item

Files Length Size Format View Description
Overture.wav 4:26 44.78Mb WAV audio wav
Act I.wav 55:38 561.5Mb WAV audio wav
Act II.wav 51:33 520.3Mb WAV audio wav
Act III.wav 45:59 464.2Mb WAV audio wav

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record