Mstislav Rostropovich The Emi Recordings

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Mstislav Rostropovich The Emi Recordings

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dc.contributor.other Mstislav Rostropovich es
dc.contributor.other Philharmonia Orchestra es
dc.contributor.other Malcolm Sargent es
dc.coverage.spatial London - United Kingdom es
dc.date.accessioned 2014-03-25T15:05:08Z
dc.date.available 2008
dc.date.available 2014-03-25T15:05:08Z
dc.date.copyright 2008
dc.date.issued 2014-03-25
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/4268
dc.description.abstract Mstislav Rostropovich was one of the great cellists, and one of the leading conductors, of his time. His performances in both arenas were characterized by a direct and strongly emotional style, and the often turbulent events of his life, including exile from his native Soviet Union, often resonated with his music making. His father, Leopold, was an acclaimed cellist and his mother was a professional pianist. In 1931, the family returned to Moscow, where Leopold taught at the Gnesin Institute. Taught by his father from the age of three, "Slava" gave his first recital at eight. He entered the Central Music School in 1939, remaining until 1941. In 1943 he entered the Moscow Conservatory. He studied cello with Semyon Kozolupov and composition with Vissarion Shebalin and Dmitri Shostakovich. He became a musical secretary to composer Sergei Prokofiev, and helped persuade the composer to rewrite his failed cello concerto in E minor as the Symphony-Concerto for Cello and Orchestra, Op. 125, one of the major masterpieces for the instrument. Rostropovich won the International Competition for Cellists in Prague in 1950, and began to concertize throughout Russia. His first appearance in the West was in Florence in 1951. He married Galina Vishnevskaya, the star soprano of the Bol'shoi Opera. The couple found themselves at odds with the authorities for the first time, since she was then being amorously pursued by Soviet President Nikolai Bulganin, who canceled their long-planned 1956 tour of the West. But Bulganin was losing power to Party Secretary Khrushchev, and the tour was reinstated, allowing Rostropovich to debut in London at the Festival Hall in March and at Carnegie Hall in New York in April. He was immediately hailed as a great international star. Returning to the U.S.S.R., Rostropovich found composers clamoring to write for him. The greatest of them, Shostakovich, wrote both his cello concertos for him. When the cellist brought the first concerto to the West for the first time, he premiered it on LP in a magnificent recording with Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra, beginning a great discography of Western recordings. On the same tour, English composer Benjamin Britten attended the London premiere of the concerto, initiating another great musical friendship with Rostropovich that led to Britten writing five masterpieces for the cello (three solo suites, a sonata, and the Cello Symphony), and a song cycle for Galina. In 1969, Rostropovich protested official mistreatment of the writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn in a letter that circulated in the West, embarrassing Soviet officials. Rostropovich and Vishnevskaya saw their scheduled concerts suddenly cancelled, and the soprano was expelled from the Bol'shoi roster. In 1974 the government granted their request to visit the West for two years, then exiled them by revoking their Soviet citizenship. Rostropovich became invisible at home, but a major star in the West. He bought the famous "Duport" Stradivarius. In September he made a London conducting debut with the New Philharmonic Orchestra and in March debuted with the National Symphony Orchestra of Washington, D.C. He was appointed its music director in 1977. In 1990 Soviet President Gorbachev reversed the Rostropovich's expulsion, resulting in an emotional return documented in the film "Soldiers of Music." When Russian President Boris Yeltsin stood up to Soviet military power, Rostropovich rushed to stand beside him in the events that led to the collapse of Soviet power. He then stepped down from leadership of the Washington orchestra, but appeared as cellist and conductor around the world. He made his first recordings of Bach's six cello suites in 1991, the result of a lifetime of study. He was a major force in inspiring new cello works from the great composers of his time. © Joseph Stevenson, All Music Guide es
dc.description.tableofcontents CD 9-- Symphony concerto in E minor Op. 125 ; I. Andante, II. Allegro giusto, III. Andante con moto (Allegretto, Allegro marcato)-- Cello concerto in C minor Op. 66 ; I. Lento ma non troppo (Andante), II. Allegro vivace (Più marcato, Meno mosso, Tempo I, Più largamente, Andante semplice e tranquillo, Tempo I, Più tranquillo, Cadenza, Lento come prima)-- Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14-- es
dc.format.extent 73:29min es
dc.format.medium 1 CD Rom (73 min., 29 seg) : Stereo 4 3/4 plg es
dc.language.iso en_US es
dc.rights Uninorte F.m Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 430058342 es
dc.subject.lcsh Symphonies, Concertos (Cello) es
dc.title Mstislav Rostropovich The Emi Recordings es
dc.title.alternative Mstislav Rostropovich The Emi Recordings es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder Emi Records Ltd. es
dc.identifier.classification 5099921759727 es
dc.subject.cdu Rostro.01 es


Files in this item

Files Length Size Format View Description
1. I. Symphony ... inor Op. 125 - Andante.mp3 10:55 14.98Mb MPEG Audio mp3
2. II. Symphony ... . 125 - Allegro giusto.mp3 17:27 23.93Mb MPEG Audio mp3
3. III. Symphon ... etto, Allegro marcato).mp3 10:02 13.76Mb MPEG Audio mp3
4. I. Cello con ... a non troppo (Andante).mp3 10:58 15.05Mb MPEG Audio mp3
5. II. Cello co ... inor Op. 66 - Completo.mp3 17:00 23.31Mb MPEG Audio mp3
6. Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14 - Completo.wav 6:46 68.28Mb WAV audio wav
Symphony concer ... nor Op. 125 - Completo.wav 38:17 386.3Mb WAV audio wav
Cello concerto in C minor Op. 66 - Completo.wav 27:54 281.6Mb WAV audio wav

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