Celibidache

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Celibidache

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dc.contributor.other Sergiu Celibidache es
dc.contributor.other Béla Bartók es
dc.contributor.other Claude Debussy es
dc.contributor.other Darius Milhaud es
dc.contributor.other Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky es
dc.contributor.other Sergey Prokofiev es
dc.contributor.other Maurice Ravel es
dc.contributor.other Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov es
dc.contributor.other Albert Roussel es
dc.contributor.other Dmitriĭ Dmitrievich Shostakovich es
dc.contributor.other Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky es
dc.contributor.other Münchner Philharmoniker es
dc.coverage.spatial Estados Unidos es
dc.date.accessioned 2014-06-05T16:09:10Z
dc.date.available 2011
dc.date.available 2014-06-05T16:09:10Z
dc.date.copyright 2011
dc.date.issued 2014-06-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/4314
dc.description.abstract Romanian-born conductor Sergiu Celibidache spent his early life in Jasí, capital of Moldavia, and in 1936 commenced music studies at the Hochschule für Musik in Berlin. At age 33, after winning a conducting competition organized by Berlin Radio, he became conductor of the reconstituted postwar Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, and toured with it to the British and American sectors of occupied Germany. In 1952 he shared the podium with the exiled Furtwängler, the Berlin Philharmonic's general music director, on a tour of the United States. Later that year when Furtwängler was cleared of allegations of being a Nazi sympathizer and he returned to Germany, Celibidache's appointment with the Berlin PO was terminated. Thereafter, the larger part of his career was with the radio orchestras of Stockholm (1964-1971), Stuttgart (1971-1977), and Paris (1973-1975). From 1979 until his death, he was music director of the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra and general music director of the City of Munich. Between 1983 and 1984, he conducted the student orchestra at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia. When a music student in Berlin, Celibidache also attended Berlin University where he studied philosophy and formed the Buddhist beliefs he retained throughout his life. He preferred the immediacy of a live performance rather than recordings and, according to his son, felt that recordings prevented the listener's spontaneous involvement with the music and gave a distorted representation of reality. Thus, though widely admired as an outstanding conductor, many of Celibidache's recordings were unauthorized, and some were of poor sound quality. It was not until after his death that, with the cooperation of his family, EMI Classics and Deutsche Grammophon released a substantial number of recordings, mainly of broadcast performances with the Stuttgart and Munich orchestras, but also with the Mannheim Philharmonic and London Philharmonic Orchestra. The repertoire is almost entirely Romantic and post-Romantic, including Beethoven, Bruckner, Brahms, Richard Strauss, Debussy, Ravel, Tchaikowsky, Respighi, and Berlioz. It is perhaps ironic that Celibidache should have received his widest exposure through a medium he did not approve. Yet his intense, finely balanced and deeply felt interpretations made him one of the greatest names in twentieth century orchestral conducting. Above all, he was a superb technician. Celibidache could not have asked for a better memorial than the current library of recordings, especially those in The Celibidache Edition, which includes lengthy rehearsal recordings (one lasts for 45 minutes, complete with English translations). Deutsche Grammophon's selection is mainly from earlier recordings made with the Stuttgart Radio Orchestra. Proceeds from both labels are given to the Celibidache Foundation for the encouragement of young musicians and a humanitarian organization he set up to assist needy people in Tibet, Romania, and other parts of the world. His own compositions include four symphonies, a piano concerto, and an orchestral suite which he recorded for UNICEF with the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra. © Roy Brewer, All Music Guide es
dc.description.tableofcontents CD4 Pyotr Ilych Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 in F minor Op. 36; Applause, I Andante sostenuto – Moderato con anima – Moderato assai quasi Andante – Allegro vivo, II Andantino in modo di canzone, III Scherzo. Pizzicato ostinato – Allegro, IV Finale Allegro con fuoco, Applause-- es
dc.format.extent 56:23 min. es
dc.format.medium 1 CD Rom (56 min.,23 seg) : Stereo 4 3/4 plg es
dc.language.iso en es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 867158994 es
dc.subject.lcsh Symphonies es
dc.title Celibidache es
dc.title.alternative French And Russian Music es
dc.title.alternative Symphony No. 4 es
dc.language.rfc3066 Eng es
dc.rights.holder EMI Records Ltd. es
dc.identifier.classification 5099908560629 es
dc.subject.cdu Celi.03 es


Files in this item

Files Length Size Format View Description
1. Symphony No. 4 in F minor Op. 36- Applause.mp3 38 884.4Kb MPEG Audio Mp3
2. Symphony No. ... Andante - Allegro vivo.mp3 23:13 31.84Mb MPEG Audio Mp3
3. Symphony No. ... ino in modo di conzano.mp3 13:00 17.83Mb MPEG Audio Mp3
4. Symphony No. ... ato ostinato - Allegro.mp3 7:04 9.703Mb MPEG Audio Mp3
5. Symphony No. ... nale Allegro con fuoco.mp3 10:43 14.69Mb MPEG Audio Mp3
6. Symphony No. 4 in F minor Op. 36- Applause.mp3 1:24 1.916Mb MPEG Audio Mp3
Symphony No. 4 in F minor Op. 36- Completo.wav 1.100Gb WAV audio Wav

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