The Complete Piano Sonatas

DSpace Repository

The Complete Piano Sonatas

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.other Ludwig Van Beethoven es
dc.contributor.other Alfred Brendel es
dc.coverage.spatial Germany es
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-28T03:22:03Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-28T03:22:03Z
dc.date.issued 2012-07-27
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/473
dc.description.abstract The developments that took place during the nineteenth century both in the piano itself and in the techniques of writing for it (the two are, of course, not separable) should not obscure the fact that, of all who have composed for it, Beethoven was the most inexhaustibly inventive - in Stravinsky's phrase, the monarch of the instrument. Among the major masters only Bach, Beethoven, and perhaps Schubert revealed in keyboard music the full depth and range of their art. At Bonn Beethoven's first teacher, Neefe, introduced him to the "Forty-eight," in which the child must have found an unsurpassable paradigm of variety in textures, to say nothing of the imaginative splendours of the music itself. So, although the mature Beethoven would occasionally write some trifle for the drawing-room, the piano was, from his earliest years, an instrument to which he could entrust his deepest thoughts; in 32 sonatas even hostile criticism can find nothing making concession to polite sentiment or to fashion. Both Mendelssohn and Liszt noted the neglect of all but a few of the sonatas in the 1830s, when the piano repertoire was based on such facile masters as Hummel or even Moscheles. It is claimed by admirers of Clementi and Dussek - composers of impeccable seriousness - that Beethoven's piano writing is far less original than is supposed, being in fact largely founded on theirs. Such views assume a separation of idea and execution, but the idea is the notes on the page, or rather their transformation into sound. The "writing for the instrument" is not a tool to be passeo from one worker to another and Beethoven's piano style is uniquely original in each sonata, the textures being no more interchangeable than the themes. For instance, there are slow movements marked Adagio or Largo in six of the first seven sonatas (i.e. from Op. 2 to the "Pathetique"), each with its characteristic sonority evocative of, without simulating, the orchestra and other media including, as in Op. 10 No. 3, some that lay far in the future. In the middle period the very nature of the piano itself seems to be expressed with the "Waldstein" and "Appassionata," as was noted, though with reserved admiration, by Busoni, who complained that "the melodic element was lost in modulatory and figurative eloquence." That Beethoven himself later became impatient with even the grandest of keyboard eloquence is suggested by his reported dismissal of the C minor Variations (WoO 80) - "Oh Beethoven, what an ass you were!" Nonetheless, part of the unique greatness of the sonatas is the inseparability of thought and medium; the variation movements of Op. 109 and Op. 111 are as unrealisable in any medium but the piano as is the rondo of the "Waldstein," while the first movement of Op. 111 finds new meanings in that C minor rhetoric itself. es
dc.description.tableofcontents Cd 9 – 3 Sonata No. 26 in E flat Op. 81 a ‘’Les adieux’’ ; I Das Lebewohl (Adagio. Allegro), II Abwesendheit (Andante espressivo), III Das Wiedersehn (Vivacissimamente)-- Sonata No. 27 in E minor Op. 90 ; I Mit Lebhaftigkeit und durchaus mit Empfindung und Ausdruck, II Nicht zu geschwind und sehr singbar vorgetragen-- Sonata No. 28 in A Op. 101 ; I Etwas lebhaft und mit der innigsten Empfindung (Allegretto ma non troppo), II Lebhaft, marschmäßig (Vivace alla Marcia), III Langsam und sehnsuchtsvoll (Adagio ma non troppo, con affetto), IV Geschwind, doch nicht zu sehr und mit Entscholossenheit (Allegro)-- es
dc.format.medium 1 CD-Rom (31 min., 07 seg.) : Stereo ; 4 3/4 plg es
dc.language.iso en_US es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M. Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 22015795 es
dc.subject.lcsh Sonatas (Piano) Piano music es
dc.title The Complete Piano Sonatas es
dc.title.alternative Piano Sonatas es
dc.title.alternative Klaviersonaten es
dc.title.alternative Sonates Pour Piano es
dc.title.alternative Les 32 Sonates Pour Piano es
dc.title.alternative Las Sonatas Para Piano Completa es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.identifier.classification 028941257529 es
dc.subject.cdu Bee.14 es


Files in this item

Files Length Size Format View Description
1. Sonata No. 2 ... wohl (Adagio. Allegro).mp3 7:16 9.970Mb Unknown mp3
2. Sonata No. 2 ... t (Andante espressivo).mp3 4:00 5.482Mb Unknown mp3
3. Sonata No. 2 ... ehn (Vivacissimamente).mp3 5:52 8.058Mb Unknown mp3
4. Sonata No. 2 ... mpfindung und Ausdruck.mp3 5:51 8.030Mb Unknown mp3
5. Sonata No. 2 ... hr singbar vorgetragen.mp3 8:18 11.38Mb Unknown mp3
6. Sonata No. 2 ... egretto ma non troppo).mp3 4:17 5.869Mb Unknown mp3
7. Sonata No. 2 ... g (Vivace alla marcia).mp3 6:15 8.576Mb Unknown mp3
8 & 9. Sonata N ... on effetto- IV Allegro.mp3 11:15 15.42Mb Unknown mp3
Sonata No. 26 i ... es adieux'' - Completo.wav 17:03 172.1Mb WAV audio wav
Sonata No. 27 in E minor Op. 90 - Completo.wav 14:07 142.4Mb WAV audio wav
Sonata No. 28 in A Op. 101 - Completo.wav 21:41 218.8Mb WAV audio wav

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record