Triple concerto Choral fantasy

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Triple concerto Choral fantasy

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dc.contributor.other Ludwig van Beethoven es
dc.contributor.other Itzhak Perlman es
dc.contributor.other Yo-Yo Ma es
dc.contributor.other Daniel Barenboim es
dc.coverage.spatial Berlín - Alemania es
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-28T01:19:19Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-28T01:19:19Z
dc.date.copyright 1995 es
dc.date.issued 2012-07-27
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/59
dc.description.abstract Beethoven's "Triple" Concerto is often treated as the less brilliant sibling of the more imposing works composed around the same time: Fidelio, the Fourth Piano Concerto, the Violin Concerto, and the Fourth Symphony. It is important to note that this work was written with an amateur pianist in mind: the relatively simple piano part was designed for Beethoven's patron, the Archduke Rudolf; nevertheless, professional musicians are required for the brutal cello part and the less difficult—but still quite challenging—violin part. The work was not premiered until 1808, failed to go over well, and has received limited attention ever since. The themes do tend to wander, their development is rather haphazard, and there are no showy cadenzas; in the work's favor, the subtle effects for the soloists and their imaginative interplay with the orchestra must be noted. The concerto follows all the expected patterns. The first movement, Allegro, is in sonata form, with the principal themes laid out by the orchestra before the soloists put in an appearance. The first theme is optimistic, elegant, mildly striving, but completely unpretentious: almost a German walking tune. The two string soloists come in with their version of the first theme, which is soon taken up by the piano with the strings playing a subsidiary role. The soloists develop this material sometimes individually, sometimes the strings alternating with the piano, and sometimes in conjunction with various components of the orchestra. In general, though, only one soloist takes the spotlight at a time, if only for a few bars. This polite turn-taking stretches the movement beyond the point its thematic material merits, the inventive dialogue among the instruments almost compensating for the thin content. The second movement, Largo, is far more compact. Written in A flat major, this movement is highly cantabile and poetic, with the cello first singing out the theme at some length. The piano offers some atmospheric support, while the two string soloists handle most of the lingering, effusive lyricism. Clouds pass over during a minor mode episode imposed by the orchestra near the end, but the soloists modulate back to the major for a seamless transition into the finale, a Rondo alla Polacca. The "Polish" designation has to do with the rhythm rather than any appropriations of folk tunes. The movement begins sweetly enough, though with some tough turns for the string players. Spirits rise through the remainder of the rondo, with a light but distinctly pulsing rhythm (there is nevertheless an obvious polonaise right in the middle of it all) and several instances of rapid passagework for the string soloists. The trio rushes through a penultimate breakneck episode, but slows down for its last, dance-like section while the orchestra keeps trying to cut in with a big, affirmative conclusion. Beethoven composed this work in the autumn of 1808 and played as well as conducted the first performance on December 22 of that year in Vienna. In addition to pairs of winds and brass plus timpani and strings, it calls for solo voices and mixed chorus. Although a hybrid work without precedent, emulated only twice since (by Ferruccio Busoni and Ralph Vaughan Williams), the "Choral Fantasy," as it has come to be called, was composed hurriedly as a crowd-pleasing endpiece for a pre-Christmas Akademie concert. A great deal went wrong during that four-hour marathon in the Theater an der Wien, yet it was destined to become one of the most famous evenings in all of musical history. A soprano soloist had been engaged to sing the concert aria Ah! Perfido, but quarreled with Beethoven during rehearsal and withdrew in a rage; her replacement was a teenager, not only intimidated but uncontrollably tremulous. The orchestra, which had had trouble previously with their famously irascible composer, who had badmouthed them in the bargain, refused to rehearse until he left the room. Choral parts for the Fantasie came from the copyists still wet. The old theater's primitive heating system, taxed by a cold wave that year, broke down before the concert. To cap the litany of misadventures, Beethoven forgot to tell the orchestra to ignore a repeat in the A major Adagio section of the Fantasie; thus, while he went forward on the keyboard, they went backward until the performance broke down, and had to resume in medias res. Beethoven, to his credit, accepted the blame. Before that debacle, an intrepid audience had shivered through the world premieres of the Fifth and Sixth symphonies, the first public performance of Piano Concerto No. 4, and half of the recent Mass in C (Op. 86, for Haydn's patron, Esterházy), as well as the works already mentioned. As for the bedeviled "Choral Fantasy," it proved to be a prototype, in effect, of the choral finale to come 15 years later in the Ninth Symphony. Even the theme of its mainly amiable variations in C-related keys resembles the more celebrated one he would compose for Schiller's Ode to Joy in 1823. Its original form, however, goes all the way back to 1795 (a year before Ah! Perfido)—to a song, with verses by Gottfried August Bürger, entitled Gegenliebe (Mutual Love). Despite the rapid composition (for Beethoven) of his "Choral Fantasy," sketches in the storied Notebooks reveal that he had first thoughts about the substance and treatment in 1800. Remarkably, he published it in 1811 exactly as written three years before—except for the solo introduction in C minor, which he had improvised at the premiere. It has never been determined definitively if the author of the text was Beethoven's friend, Christoph Kuffner. In the event, it is sung first by six solo voices—two sopranos and alto, then two tenors and baritone—after that by the chorus. Surely only a curmudgeon could fail to be charmed by the work's overall insouciance, just as only someone stone-deaf would fail to recognize it as stylistically authoritative, middle-period Beethoven. es
dc.description.tableofcontents Triple Concerto Choral Fantasy Concerto for piano, violin cello and orchestra in c major op 56 ; Allegro, Largo, Rondo alla polacca-- Fantasy for piano choir and orchestra op 80 ; Adagio, Finale. Allegro - meno allegro, Allegro molto, Adagio, ma non troppo, Marcia. assai vivace - allegro, Allegreto. ma non troppo(Quasi andante con moto)- presto-- es
dc.format.medium 1 CD Rom : Stereo ; 4 3/4 plg es
dc.language.iso en_US es
dc.rights Uninorte fm stereo es
dc.subject.lcc 35162235 es
dc.subject.lcsh Choruses, Secular (Mixed voices) with orchestra. es
dc.title Triple concerto Choral fantasy es
dc.title.alternative Tripelkonzert Chorfantasie es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder EMI Records Ltda. es
dc.identifier.classification 724355551627 es
dc.subject.cdu Bee.23 es


Files in this item

Files Length Size Format View Description
6. Fantasy for ... op 80 - Allegro molto.mp3 1:39 2.274Mb Unknown mp3
7. Fantasy for ... Adagio, ma non troppo.mp3 2:59 4.085Mb Unknown mp3
8. Fantasy for ... assai vivace - allegro.mp3 2:15 3.079Mb Unknown mp3
9. Fantasy for ... ante con moto)- presto.mp3 3:55 5.384Mb Unknown mp3
Concerto for pi ... major op 56 - Completo.wav 34:57 352.7Mb WAV audio wav
1. Concerto for ... major op 56 - Allegro.mp3 17:04 23.41Mb Unknown mp3
2. Concerto for ... c major op 56 - Largo.mp3 5:41 7.795Mb Unknown mp3
3. Concerto for ... 6 - Rondo alla polacca.mp3 12:29 17.12Mb Unknown mp3
4. Fantasy for ... chestra op 80 - Adagio.mp3 3:54 5.346Mb Unknown mp3
5. Fantasy for ... Allegro - meno allegro.mp3 5:05 6.969Mb Unknown mp3
Fantasy for pia ... estra op 80 - Completo.wav 19:30 196.8Mb WAV audio wav

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