All the Works for Solo Instrument & Orchestra

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All the Works for Solo Instrument & Orchestra

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dc.contributor.other Antonín Dvořák es
dc.contributor.other St. Louis Symphony Orchestra es
dc.contributor.other Walter Susskind es
dc.contributor.other Rudolf Firkušný es
dc.contributor.other Ruggiero Ricci es
dc.contributor.other Zara Nelsova es
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-28T04:13:13Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-28T04:13:13Z
dc.date.copyright 1990 es
dc.date.issued 2012-07-27
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/618
dc.description.abstract Widely regarded as the most distinguished of Czech composers, Antonin Dvorák (1841-1904) produced attractive and vigorous music possessed of clear formal outlines, melodies that are both memorable and spontaneous-sounding, and a colorful, effective instrumental sense. Dvorák is considered one of the major figures of nationalism, both proselytizing for and making actual use of folk influences, which he expertly combined with Classical forms in works of all genres. His symphonies are among his most widely appreciated works; the Symphony No. 9 ("From the New World," 1893) takes a place among the finest and most popular examples of the symphonic literature. Similarly, his Cello Concerto (1894-1895) is one of the cornerstones of the repertory, providing the soloist an opportunity for virtuosic flair and soaring expressivity. Dvorák displayed special skill in writing for chamber ensembles, producing dozens of such works; among these, his 14 string quartets (1862-1895), the "American" Quintet (1893) and the "Dumky" Trio (1890-1891) are outstanding examples of their respective genres, overflowing with attractive folklike melodies set like jewels into the solid fixtures of Brahmsian absolute forms. Dvorák's "American" and "New World" works arose during the composer's sojourn in the United States in the early 1890s; he was uneasy with American high society and retreated to a small, predominantly Czech town in Iowa for summer vacations during his stay. However, he did make the acquaintance of the pioneering African-American baritone H.T. Burleigh, who may have influenced the seemingly spiritual-like melodies in the "New World" symphony and other works; some claim that the similarity resulted instead from a natural affinity between African-American and Eastern European melodic structures. By that time, Dvorák was among the most celebrated of European composers, seen by many as the heir to Brahms, who had championed Dvorák during the younger composer's long climb to the top. The son of a butcher and occasional zither player, Dvorák studied the organ in Prague as a young man and worked variously as a café violist and church organist during the 1860s and 1870s while creating a growing body of symphonies, chamber music, and Czech-language opera. For three years in the 1870s he won a government grant (the Viennese critic Hanslick was among the judges) designed to help the careers of struggling young creative artists. Brahms gained for Dvorák a contract with his own publisher, Simrock, in 1877; the association proved a profitable one despite an initial controversy that flared when Dvorák insisted on including Czech-language work titles on the printed covers, a novelty in those musically German-dominated times. In the 1880s and 1890s Dvorák's reputation became international in scope thanks to a series of major masterpieces that included the Seventh, Eighth, and "New World" symphonies. At the end of his life he turned to opera once again; Rusalka, from 1901, incorporates Wagnerian influences into the musical telling of its legend-based story, and remains the most frequently performed of the composer's vocal works. Dvorák, a professor at Prague University from 1891 on, exerted a deep influence on Czech music of the twentieth century; among his students was Josef Suk, who also became his son-in-law. © AMG, All Music Guide es
dc.description.tableofcontents CD 1-- Piano Concerto in G minor, Op. 33 ; Allegro agigato, Andante sostenuto, Finale (Allegro con fuoco)-- Romance in F minor, Op. 11-- Mazurek in E minor, Op. 49-- Silent Woods, Op. 68-- Rondo in G minor, Op. 94. es
dc.format.medium 1 CD-Rom (63 min., 40 seg.) : stereo ; 4 3/4 pulg. es
dc.language.iso en es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M. Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 77251581 es
dc.subject.lcsh Concertos (Piano) ; Violon et orchestre ; Violon et orchestre arr. Violoncelle et orchestre arr. ; Concertos (Violon) ; Concertos (Violoncelle) es
dc.title All the Works for Solo Instrument & Orchestra es
dc.title.alternative Complete works for solo instrument & orchestra es
dc.title.alternative Works for solo instrument & orchestra. es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder The Moss Music Group es
dc.identifier.classification 047163501524 es
dc.subject.cdu Dv.03 es


Files in this item

Files Length Size Format View Description
Piano Concerto in G minor, Op. 33-Completo.wav 36:49 371.6Mb WAV audio WAV
Romance in F minor, Op 11-Completo.wav 9:56 100.2Mb WAV audio WAV
Mazurek in E minor, Op. 49-Completo.wav 5:35 56.35Mb WAV audio WAV
Silent Wodds, Op. 68-Completo.wav 4:59 50.30Mb WAV audio WAV
Rondo in G minor, Op. 94-Completo.wav 6:12 62.56Mb WAV audio WAV
1. Piano Concer ... Op. 33-Allegro agigato.mp3 18:02 12.37Mb Unknown Mp3
2. Piano Concer ... . 33-Andante sostenuto.mp3 8:16 5.669Mb Unknown Mp3
3. Piano Concer ... le (Allegro con fuoco).mp3 10:37 7.274Mb Unknown Mp3

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