Symphony No. 2; Russia (Symphonic poem)

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Symphony No. 2; Russia (Symphonic poem)

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dc.contributor.other Milli Alexeyevich Balakirev es
dc.contributor.other Russian State Symphony Orchestra es
dc.contributor.other Igor Golovschin es
dc.coverage.spatial Moscow, Russia es
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-28T04:16:09Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-28T04:16:09Z
dc.date.copyright 1994 es
dc.date.issued 2012-07-27
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/628
dc.description.abstract Balakirev occupies an important if equivocal position in the history of Russian musicof the later part of the nineteenth century. He was bom in Nizhny-Novgorod in 1837 and had his first piano lessons from his mother, who later arranged some lessons for him with Alexander Dubuque, a pupil of John Reld. Through a later teacher, the German Karl Eisrich, he was introduced to the circle of Alexander Ulibishev, an enthusiastic amateur, author of books on Mozart and Beethoven and owner of a useful music library. At UlibTshev's house he was able to hear chamber music and occasionally orchestral works, the inspiration for his own early compositions. It was through the agency of this patron that Balakirev was able in 1855 to travel to St. Petersburg, where he met Glinka and other well known musicians and made his own debut as a pianist and composer. Supporting himself with difficulty by giving piano lessons and private performances, Balakirev managed to survive in St. Petersburg, where he mettwo young army officers, Cesar Cui and Modest Mussorgsky, both keen amateur composers, over whom he began to exercise some influence. He had, at the same time, formed a friendship with Dmitry and Vladimir Stasov, the latter an importantfigure in the intellectual support of Russian musical nationalism. In 1861 he met Rimsky-Korsakov and the following year Borodin, completing the group of five Russian nationalists described by Vladimir Stasov as the Mighty Handful, the Five who would follow Glinka's example in the creation of a distinctively Russian musical tradition. Atthe same time Balakirev had increasing involvement with the Free School of Music in St. Petersburg, set up in opposition to the 'German' Conservatory established by Anton Rubinstein, with the encouragement of the Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna, who did her best to remove Balakirev from the conductorship of the Russian Music Society concerts, which were under her patronage. Balakirev's own character, obstinate and tactless, did much to increase the division between the Conservatory and his own followers, castigated byAntor(Rubinstein as amateurs, a charge that could never have been levelled at him. Balakirev's later relationship with Nikolai Rubinstein and the Moscow Conseivatory, where Tchaikovsky taught, was more satisfactory, and it was Nikolai Rubinstein who introduced the oriental fantasy for piano, Islamey, to the St. Petersburg public in 1869. Religious conversion led to a brief retirementfrom musical life and from familiar society between 1871 and 1874, but gradually thereafter Balakirev resumed something of his old activities, particularly in 1881 the direction of the Free School which he had surrendered to Rimsky-Korsakov in 1874. In 1883 his friends found for him a position as director of the Imperial Court Chapel, where he was assisted by Rimsky-Korsakov. A breach with the latter came in 1890, as belyayev, an important patron and publisher of Russian music, gradually seemea to usurp his place as leader of the Russian nationalist composers. A measureof friendship was restored, to be destroyed completely and finally by Rimsky-Korsakov s behaviour at the first performance of Balakirev's First Symphony at a Free School Concert in 1898. Balakirev had retired from the Imperial Chapel in 1895 and thereafter had devoted himself more fully to composition, to his continuing task of editing the music of Glinka and to the encouragement of a new group of young Russian composers, including his always loyal disciple Sergei Liapunov who later orchestrated Islamey. Freedom from other activity allowed the completion of a symphony he had started many years before and the completion of a second in 1908. In this final period of his life he attracted little attention from the musical public and expressed some bitterness atthe neglectof hiswork. Russianmusic,nevertheless,owedhimaconsiderabledebt.Combative Dy temperament, he had fought for his own conception of truly Russian music, whichfound future expression in a synthesis of the technique of the Conservatories and the spirit that he had engendered and nurtured. es
dc.description.tableofcontents Symphony No. 2 in D minor: Allegro ma non troppo, Scherzo alla cosacca: Allegro ma non troppo, ma con fuoco e energico, Romanza: Andante, Finale: Polonaise-- Russia, symphonic poem es
dc.format.medium 1 CD-Rom (53 min., 30 seg.): stereo; 4 3/4 plg. es
dc.language.iso en es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M. Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 32183877 es
dc.subject.lcsh Symphonies. Symphonic poems. es
dc.title Symphony No. 2; Russia (Symphonic poem) es
dc.title.alternative Sinfonía N° 2, Rusia (Poema Sinfónico) es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder HNH International Ltd. es
dc.identifier.classification 730099579322 es
dc.subject.cdu Bal.01 es


Files in this item

Files Length Size Format View Description
1. Symphony No. ... -Allegro ma non troppo.mp3 10:24 7.132Mb Unknown Mp3
2. Symphony No. ... a con fuoco e energico.mp3 7:52 5.398Mb Unknown Mp3
3. Symphony No. 2 in D minor-Romanza-Andante.mp3 9:38 6.602Mb Unknown Mp3
4. Symphony No. 2 in D minor-Finale-Polonaise.mp3 9:12 6.312Mb Unknown Mp3
Symphony No. 2 in D minor-Completo.wav 36:58 373.0Mb WAV audio WAV
Russia, symphonic poem.wav 16:17 164.4Mb WAV audio WAV

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