Mass In B Minor

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Mass In B Minor

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dc.contributor.other Johann Sebastian Bach es
dc.contributor.other Pierrette Alarie es
dc.contributor.other Leopold Simoneau es
dc.contributor.other Nan Merriman es
dc.contributor.other Gustav Neidlinger es
dc.contributor.other Willi Boskovsky es
dc.contributor.other Franz Holetschek es
dc.contributor.other Hermann Scherchen es
dc.contributor.other Vienna State Opera Orchestra es
dc.contributor.other Vienna Academy Chorus es
dc.coverage.spatial Universal City, California, U.S.A. es
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-28T13:51:01Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-28T13:51:01Z
dc.date.copyright 1989 es
dc.date.issued 2012-07-28
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/900
dc.description.abstract The Mass in B Minor is one of the great art works of modern Western Civilization. And yet, strangely enough, it is actually a composite work, in its present complete form a kind of inspired afterthought on Bachs part; it is in surprisingly large part patched together from ideas borrowed out of earlier Bach works. The complete Mass was never performed as such under Bachs direction. Nor anywhere eise either during his life or for many years thereafter — though probably all of the music was performed, piecemeal. for special Services in Bachs two churches. The Gloria, for instance. was copied out especially for a Christ¬mas Performance some seven years after its composition; the Kyrie and Credo probably were given at other appropriate times. Indeed, the Mass appeared first in a form that included only the first eleven movements (the Kyrie and Gloria) of the present twenty-four, which Bach entitled "Missa." according to the then Lutheran usage. The Missa. clearly intended as a complete work in itself. was submitted in July. 1733, to the new Elector of Saxony at Dresden with a humble request for an appointment as Court Composer. The thirteen additional move¬ments were added to the Missa well after this. evidently to fill out the shape of a grand Mass, supplementing the Kyrie and Gloria with the traditional Credo, Sanctus and Dei sections. The additional music was never submitted to the Elector. When some three years later, Bach belatedly received the nominal title of Court Composer at Dresden he sent a further offering of music; instead of the additional number of the B Minor Mass. he submitted four more works in the same "Missa" form, these quite hastily improvised by the adaptation of earlier works of Bach to the Latin text. It might be added that the manuscript of the B Minor Mass, though it won Bach the desired title, was apparently never performed at Dresden, noreven removed from its wrapper for more than casual inspection. The parts remamed in Dresden, unsullied. almost two centuries later. An immediate query of most listeners may be is the B Minor Mass a "practical" religious work that is. was it intended for use in any actual religious service? The answer is indubitably no, if we speak of the whole as Bach finally compiled it. Nor has it ever been so used. It is a profoundly religious work without question; but it was intended for musical Performance very much in the manner that we now know it best, as a sacred concert or "musical Service" based on religious text and even on religious dogma. but making its effect solely through the musical medium, with¬out accompanying ritual. (Indeed, it is obvious that for practical reasons no existing religious service could be conducted on the huge scale required by the music.) Its presence in recorded form, then, is entirely within Bachs original intention. Is this a Catholic Mass? The answer, again. is no. The circumstances of the presentation of the Kyrie and Gloria to the Elector's Court at Dresden where a Catholic chapel had been maintamed for many years has misled many into assuming that Bach deliberately set a High Mass for use in actual ritual of that faith. The use of Latin text would superficial^ indicate the same. Bach being him-self a Lutheran who composed all his other religious music to German texts. It is quite certam that this was not his intention — not only because of the utterly impractical length of the whole work (nor would the truncated "Missa." the Kyrie and Gloria alone, be of any use in an actual Catholic service) but more particularly because of internal evidence such as Bachs use of numerous ex¬pressive words that did not accord with the accepted Catholic text and thus most definitely could not have been admitted into any official Catholic ritual. (The text of the Mass, it must be remembered. sums up in large part the articles of faith and dogma that have been evolved for centuries and even a change of a Single word can involve enormous areas of belief that have in the past been the Separation between the whole bodies of Christian belief.) What is more, it is not too commonly known that in Bachs day the Lutheran Church made extensive use not only of portions of the original Catholic ritual, outwardly not much altered, but also of the Latin texts. The "Missa" that Bach wrote for Dresden was actually an existing form of ritual in the Lutheran Church of the time, and could theoretically have been used by Bach in an actual service. Every other portion of the B Minor Mass could have been put to Lutheran use as well. Protestant Services of that time were much longer than ours today and were frequently based on the Catholic "frame work" so to speak. with significant alterations and additions. such as the smging of the Choräle hymns in the German. es
dc.description.tableofcontents I Kyrie; Chorus - Kyrie Eleison, Duet 2-Christe Eleison, Chorus 3 -Kyrie Eleison-- II Gloria; Chorus 4 -Gloria in excelis deo, Aria 5 -Laudamus te, Benedicimus te, Adoramus te, Chorus 6 -Gratias Agimus tibi propter magnam gloriam tuam, Duet 7 -Domine deus rex coeletis!, Chorus 8- Qui tollis peccata mundi Missere nobis, Aria 9-Qui sedes ad dexteram patris missere nobis, Aria 10 - Quoniam tu solus sanctus tu solus dominus, Chorus 11 -Cum sancto spiritu in gloria dei patris Amen-- es
dc.format.medium 1 CD-Rom. (64 min., 05 seg.) : Stereo ; 4 3/4 plg. es
dc.language.iso en es
dc.rights Uninorte F.M.Estéreo es
dc.subject.lcc 24741635 es
dc.subject.lcsh Masses, Misas es
dc.title Mass In B Minor es
dc.title.alternative Misa en Si Menor es
dc.language.rfc3066 eng es
dc.rights.holder MCA Records, INC es
dc.identifier.classification 076732982129 es
dc.subject.cdu B.08 es


Files in this item

Files Length Size Format View Description
1. I Kyrie Chorus 1- Kyrie Eleison.mp3 14:50 13.55Mb Unknown mp3
2. I Kyrie Duet 2- Christe Eleison.mp3 4:54 4.486Mb Unknown mp3
3. I Kyrie Chorus 3- Kyrie Eleison.mp3 5:27 4.978Mb Unknown mp3
4. II Gloria Chorus 4- Gloria in Excelis deo.mp3 7:22 6.735Mb Unknown mp3
5. II Gloria Ar ... icimun te. Adoramus te.mp3 4:50 4.421Mb Unknown mp3
6. II Gloria C ... er Magnam Gloriam Tuam.mp3 3:22 3.081Mb Unknown mp3
7. II Gloria Du ... e Deus. Rex Coelestis!.mp3 5:48 5.296Mb Unknown mp3
8. II Gloria Ch ... Mundi. Misserere Nobis.mp3 4:55 4.491Mb Unknown mp3
9. II Gloria Ar ... m Patris Misere Nobis!.mp3 5:05 4.647Mb Unknown mp3
10. II Gloria A ... ctus, tu solus dominus.mp3 6:12 5.666Mb Unknown mp3
11. II Gloria C ... loria dei patris, Amen.mp3 4:47 4.372Mb Unknown mp3
I Kyrie- Completo.wav 25:11 254.1Mb WAV audio wav
II Gloria- Completo.wav 42:20 427.2Mb WAV audio wav

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